After 38 Years, Finally 'Relatives' Far Dinosaur Egg laying


Animals lizard one order with this dinosaur nesting after nearly 40 years in captivity.
New Zealand - Tuatara lizard tangible, but in fact, they are close relatives of dinosaurs. They are the order of the duck-billed dinosaurs, and the only species of ancient animals that are still there.

Since 70 million years ago, they have become endangered species, no more Tuatara other than in New Zealand.

More recently, a captive tuatara at Chester Zoo, spawn for the first time since 38 years.

Independent quoted, in captivity, it is difficult to breed tuatara. These animals need to be 20 years old to be married, and only able to lay eggs once every four years.

However, after four decades of trying, a tuatara were born after the incubation period, 238 days.

"I have a long career and a full impression at the zoo. One of my experience was witnessing the birth of dragons, but this moment is not invincible," said Isolde McGeorge, specialist midwife claim the first tuatara from England.

"It's one of my dreams to breed tuatara, and we are now achieving after overseeing these eggs all the time," she said.

According to McGeorge, tuatara are very difficult to breed, and he thought he knew a lot about the animal.

"It takes hard work, through a lot of stressful moments, and continue to change the living conditions of these animals. But all was not in vain," he added.

Third Eye

Although similar to the tuatara lizard, they actually came from reptiles called the order Rhynchocephalia. The group used to be very dominant, however, all extinct, except the tuatara.

One of the unique features possessed this animal is the 'third eye' in the middle of their foreheads. Despite having retina, cornea, lens and nerve, 'eye' can not be used to seeing.
After 38 Years, Finally 'Relatives' Far dinosaur laying (flicker)
"Tuatara lived before the dinosaurs, along with the dinosaurs and survived after dinosaurs became extinct. They are a living fossil and the miracle of evolution," said McGeorge.

McGeorge only ever witnessed the installation of two tuatara. As the mating season, the females raise their comb while males marched like soldiers. In Chester, the male tuatara pairing with females of the Mustard Pixie takes two years to the female produces two eggs.

Life Slow

According to McGeorge, slow-paced life of the tuatara.

"They never rush, their metabolism is very slow. In one minute, they just breathe five times and his heart five to eight times. They only reproduce every four years, and eggs need to incubate almost a year to hatch."

Once fertilized, the female lays eggs in the sand tuatara away from the hole where he lives. They are nocturnal animals, all done in the evenings. It is increasingly difficult, but McGeorge managed to put two eggs in an incubator where the temperature can continue to be regulated so as to survive in between 18 to 22 degrees Celsius.

The night before the eggs hatch, McGeorge see any fluid in the shell of one egg, the next day, the eggs hatch.

"I cried, I really feel happy with what we've achieved. Now we already have the key factor, the challenge is to repeat the success and do it again and again.

Baby tuatara was born in early December, but recent Chester zoo now publish it. The zoo will be the focus in Channer 4 documentary, The Secret Life of the Zoo.

For the baby tuatara, named Chester zoo 'Isolde', on behalf of the front McGeorge, although there is the possibility that the baby was a boy.

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